Worth a Word Wednesday: Scribbly Gums



 Wordless Wednesday – has now been renamed ‘Worth a Word’ Wednesday simply because I can’t stick to the rules of NO WORDS 🙂

Scribbly Gums In the Australian bush are very special trees

Scribbly Gums

Theses magnificent trees deserve to have some words written about them.  Can you see the scribbles on them?  They are found in the bush near where where my husband grew up in Nowra on the South Coast of NSW, and I love trying to read their scribbles.

In case you don’t know what they are here is some information as paraphrased from Wikipedia.  I must admit that I learnt something about them too!

Eucalyptus haemastoma, the scribbly gum, is an Australian eucalypt that is named after the “scribbles” on its bark. These zigzag tracks are tunnels made by the larvae of the scribbly gum moth (Ogmograptis scribula) and follow the insect’s life cycle. Eggs are laid between layers of old and new bark. The larvae burrow into the new bark and, as the old bark falls away, the trails are revealed. The diameters of the tunnels increase as the larvae grow, and the ends of the tracks are where the larvae stopped to pupate.

Eucalyptus haemastoma is a small to medium-sized tree (or occasionally a mallee). The bark is smooth, white/grey. Distribution is restricted to the coastal plains and hills in the Sydney region.[1]

We don’t have them here in the mountains where I live, as I assume we are too cold a climate.

What do you think of these scribbly gums?  Have you seen anything like them where you are?  Nature truly is amazing 🙂

Scribbly gums in the Australian Bush are very interesting trees and deserve a few words for Worth a Word Wednesday!!

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In case you didn’t know. recently my blogging friend Suzanne at Global Housesitter x2 suggested I change the name of my Wordless Wednesday posts to Worth a Word Wednesday, as I rarely seem able to refrain from using some words in these posts, despite the title!!  So I’ve done just that!

Feel free to join in, post a photo and as many words as you like!  We would like to open this up to anyone to join in, have you any suggestions?

I love it when people leave me a comment, so don’t be shy – comment away!

Debbie 🙂

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Categories: Australia, beauty, blogging, Earth, Nature, photoblogging, Travel, winter, wordless Wednesday, Worth a word WednesdayTags: , , , ,

23 comments

  1. Wikipedia does have its uses, and I must admit I use it on a regular basis. Nature is certainly fascinating, and I have not heard about that tree before now. Thanks for sharing Deb. Good photo of the tree.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I love gum trees Debbie especially the ghost gums.Your photo of the scribble gums is stunning. I grew up in Sydney and also spent two years in Kiama which is just north of Norwra however I don’t recall seeing these. thanks for the background info.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’ve never seen these in WA – my husband says there are some further up North – we tend to have a lot of paperbarks near us – they love the wetlands. Interesting to see the scribbles up close.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Fabulous photo of a fascinating tree! I’ve never seen anything like these scribbles. As far as I know we don’t get these in South Africa.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I’ll try to remember for next Wednesday … what a good idea!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Thanks for this post, Debbie. You’ve helped me identify gums trees that I’ve seen here in Tassie 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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