What’s in a name – Somerset style

A-Z of Somerset names

When visitors come to our town of Tumbarumba (in NSW Australia), we try not to laugh at their pronunciations of our sometimes odd sounding places.  By the way, it’s pronounced exactly as it is written: Tumba-Rumba. Now the boot is definitely on the other foot! While visiting family in Cheddar, in Somerset, we had fun compiling this list.

Here’s my A-Z of Somerset names:

Axbridge

Banwell, Bath, Bristol

Cheddar, Chewton Mendip

Draycott

Easton

Farrington Gurney, Frome

Glastonbury

Haybridge, Highbridge

Inglesbatch, Icelton, Illford, Illminster

Jacob’s Ladder

Keynsham, Kewstoke

Lower Weare

Midsomer Norton, Montacute

Nailsea, Nempnett Thrubwell, Nyland

Oare, Oath

Priddy, Peasedown St. John

Queen Camel, Queen Charlton

Rodney Stoke

Shipham, Street, Shepton Mallet

The Horringtons, Taunton, Thurloxton

Uphill, Ubley, Upper Weare

Vellore, Vobster, Vole

Wookey Hole, Wells, Wedmore, Westbury-Sub-Mendip

X – marks the spot – we could not find any names starting with X!!

Yatton, Yaxley

Zummerzet – ‘Somerset’ in the local lingo

Apparently The Wurzels produced a song called All Over the Mendips – which is something similar to our Australian ‘I’ve been everywhere man, I’ve been everywhere’they both celebrate unusual names and are lots of fun!

Bishop's Palace in Wells
Bishop’s Palace in Wells, Somerset

Why?

There has been a plethora of enjoyable A-Z posts lately from my blogging buddies.  I take my hat off to those who did the A-Z challenge in April which meant posting every day except Sundays, on a theme of their choice, following the alphabet each day.  I’ve also seen a few bloggers writing A-L and M-Z posts,  sharing snippets about themselves according to the letter of the alphabet.

Although this sounded like fun, I thought a post on the A-Z of town/village names around Cheddar in Somerset would be far more interesting than a post about me, so I decided to make a list of all the fabulous names in nearby areas.

Please note this is only a selection of names, there are many more place names that are just as interesting, which I haven’t listed!

I must say we had a fun time finding names for each letter of the alphabet and thanks go to Craig (son-in-law) for his local knowledge. Somerset has a language all of its own, West Country, and I love hearing the strong and unusual accents.

A favourite

I think of all these, my favourite is Nempnett Thrubwell – it’s one that is new to me and I just love the sound of it rolling off the tongue, or not, as the case may be!  It was exciting when we were out driving and saw it on a sign post. We yelled, stopped, backed up and I managed to get a shot!

What about you, any names take your fancy or do you have any to add to this list?

I’m currently travelling for a few months with The Mathematician and we’re loving the differences in climate, culture and scenery.  You can follow our travels on my page: Our Odyssey if you’d care to join us.  You’re most welcome to tag along 🙂

Deb xx

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31 Replies to “What’s in a name – Somerset style”

  1. The Poms certainly know how to name their towns don’t they Deb? Ubley sounds like somewhere the Teletubbies would live! Nice to see you jumping on the AtoZ wagon – better late than never 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh there really is a Midsomer, Deb! I’m a fan of Midsomer Murders and yes Nempnett Thrubwell sounds just like an English village doesn’t it? Loved your post but you have to put up with one more about me in ‘Me from MtoZ’ then I think everyone will now everything about me including what I had for breakfast last Thursday LOL:) Glad you are enjoying your holiday and sending love from Australia xx

    Liked by 1 person

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